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Thread: New roof melting linseed oil

  1. #1

    New roof melting linseed oil

    Hi. I have a problem with a new roof and am not sure what to do. The house is a log cabin built in 85. The interior logs and beams were treated with linseed oil after being built and have been problem free ever since.

    This spring we replaced the previous asphalt shingle roof with a metal roof. Not long after the installation we thought it was leaking. The company that installed it came back and made sure it wasn't. Then we thought maybe it was condensation collecting and dripping. However, what is dripping has a sticky, gummy texture.

    So now we are thinking the heat is melting the linseed oil in the beams and that is what is dripping out. Has anyone experienced this before? Any ideas to remedy the problem?

  2. #2
    LHBA Member Shark's Avatar
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    I would think that shingles would be just as hot as a metal roof?

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  3. #3
    Linseed oil is a drying oil, so if it was applied in 1985, it would have been dried solid well before 1986. It also has a very distinct smell which would be quite powerful if it truely was linseed oil.

    Are you sure it isn't creosote? I had a property where the chimney deteriorated, and an oily wet sticky substance was percolating out of the brick chimney, staining the ceiling and walls below. It wasn't from a fireplace, it was the exhaust from the natural gas furnace and hot water heater. I didn't think those appliances produced creosote but I guess they do.

    I guess it could be sap too? Maybe the roof crews screws or nails opened up pockets of sap in the logs, but again in a structure older than me I'd think that would be dried up too.

    Smell would tell you if it's sap or linseed oil or not. Check any chimney or flues you may have too.

    Also, what kind of metal roof?? perhaps the new roof isn't vented right and you now how a double vapor barrier scenario and it's sticky for some unknown reason.

  4. #4
    Yes, I would think the shingles would get just as hot as well.

    I don't think it's creosote. It's not coming from near the chimney. Plus the chimney gets minimal use as we've had an outdoor wood stove for nearly 20 years.

    The dripping is happening all along the main beams. I would think everything would be well dried and cured by this point, however something sticky is still dripping out of the beams. No major smell to speak of.

    I'm not sure what kind of metal roof, just metal.. lol.

    It was a professional team that installed it, but perhaps it isn't vented right. That I can understand, but I'm still not sure why what's dripping is thick and sticky.

    Thanks for the thoughts and ideas

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by meisdug View Post
    Yes, I would think the shingles would get just as hot as well.

    I don't think it's creosote. It's not coming from near the chimney. Plus the chimney gets minimal use as we've had an outdoor wood stove for nearly 20 years.

    The dripping is happening all along the main beams. I would think everything would be well dried and cured by this point, however something sticky is still dripping out of the beams. No major smell to speak of.

    I'm not sure what kind of metal roof, just metal.. lol.

    It was a professional team that installed it, but perhaps it isn't vented right. That I can understand, but I'm still not sure why what's dripping is thick and sticky.

    Thanks for the thoughts and ideas

    Is it possible the roofers used a sealant that is reacting to the heat? For example, I've seen Liquid Nails separate into a liquid and a paste. I'm not saying this is from Liquid Nails, but maybe something is doing the same thing.

  6. #6
    what color is the stuff that's dripping? our DF rafters have been underroof for several years and we still have sap dripping down from a few of them

  7. #7
    LHBA Member loghousenut's Avatar
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    My question is, why is it that hot on the underside of the roof? Is there no insulation?
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