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Thread: Longleaf Yellow Pine - Problems using these logs?

  1. #1
    Merrick
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    Longleaf Yellow Pine - Problems using these logs?

    I am trying to recruit someone to come to the class with me. This person is a structural engineer and stands hard against the possibility of using the longleaf yellow pine or southern pine as some call it, for building a log home using the butt and pass method. He contends the logs are too prone to rot and you'd have to haul in cypress or some other specie by rail or truck down here and it would cost too much. I'm arguing the point about how many people it would take to build a home as well as the possibility of doing it for under 40$ a foot. It is my understanding from reading on this forum that you can use the pine down here as long as you avoid the beetles, peel properly and subsequently treat and keep dry as well as put the overhangs on the home as taught in the class. Is this correct? Can you use these logs without any future issues down here so far south next to the gulf? I would really like to have my friend understand this better as I will probably be doing this solo when the times comes if I cannot convince him. Thanks, Merrick.

  2. #2
    LHBA Member Cruiser's Avatar
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    Merrick, pine is suitable for building with this method. Once you take the class you (and your friend if he goes) will fully understand why. I will probably be building with pine myself in Mississippi, so I understand about the heat, humidity, bugs, etc. Sure, there are other species I would rather use for many different reasons, but after taking the class and fully understanding the logic, I have no reservations in using pine. Take the class and you will have this and countless other questions answered...and then you can get on the "other side" and get answers to questions you'll have that you haven't even dreamed of yet. Go ahead and jump in...the water is warm!

  3. #3
    Merrick
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    I was hoping someone would say that. I really appreciate it. I'll press forward, with or without my friend. I'm getting more and more excited as is everyone else.

    Is there some other specie that would be better suited for building down here? I guess I was looking at pine because there is so darn much of it here. I assumed it would be the cheapest and straightest as well. I could be wrong as is sometimes the case. I'm trying the keep the little wheels in my head turning so I can plan as much as possible until I can get to the class.

    Thanks for any input you can offer.

    Merrick

  4. #4
    Merrick
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    Cruiser, also I wanted to add I saw some old blogs/threads on forfarmers dot com regarding giving away hundreds of logs if someone could haul them. I am sure this kind of opportunity does not pop up very often but it is promising nonetheless. Have you checked it out?

    M

  5. #5
    LHBA Member ssshipley77's Avatar
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    Merrick, I also had this concern living in East Texas as I have 10 acres of longleaf pines I plan on using. I cut down several smaller trees over a year ago peeled them, and set them on blocks uncovered and untreated. As of now there has been no rot or major bug damage. I feel confident that under cover and treated they will last longer than me.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Merrick View Post
    I am trying to recruit someone to come to the class with me. This person is a structural engineer and stands hard against the possibility of using the longleaf yellow pine or southern pine as some call it, for building a log home using the butt and pass method. He contends the logs are too prone to rot and you'd have to haul in cypress or some other specie by rail or truck down here and it would cost too much. I'm arguing the point about how many people it would take to build a home as well as the possibility of doing it for under 40$ a foot. It is my understanding from reading on this forum that you can use the pine down here as long as you avoid the beetles, peel properly and subsequently treat and keep dry as well as put the overhangs on the home as taught in the class. Is this correct? Can you use these logs without any future issues down here so far south next to the gulf? I would really like to have my friend understand this better as I will probably be doing this solo when the times comes if I cannot convince him. Thanks, Merrick.
    Merrick, I wouldn't be scared to use longleaf pine. Among the 10 or so species lumped into 'Southern Yellow Pine', it is the strongest. In fact it is as strong or stronger than Douglas Fir. Search a little for span charts of dimensional lumber on the internet, some show the span capabilities of longleaf to be better than doug fir. If I recall correctly it is also more slightly more rot resistance than other SYP species due to it's high pitch content. It's also very heavy for this reason. Old growth cypress is probably better but can have it's own problems with rot(sapwood). Follow the directions from the class and your house(s) should outlast you and your grandkids.

    I have to point out too that the climate the wood is used in is a huge factor, more so than the wood. Doug fir or most other species will still rot quicker along the gulf coast than they would in Eastern Montana. If you took longleaf to the regions where doug fir is common it would probably last as long.

  7. #7
    LHBA Member Cruiser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Merrick View Post
    Cruiser, also I wanted to add I saw some old blogs/threads on forfarmers dot com regarding giving away hundreds of logs if someone could haul them. I am sure this kind of opportunity does not pop up very often but it is promising nonetheless. Have you checked it out?

    M
    Merrick,

    Thanks for the website tip. I'll check it out. I would love to use cypress, but I believe it will be cost prohibitive. Poplar is another alternative with it being a common species in this area. Each type of tree has it's own unique characteristics, but most hat are suggested will work just fine using the LHBA method. That's one of the beauties of this style home! I'm just like you...constantly reading and learning all I can...and enjoying every minute!

  8. #8
    Where in the south are you planning to build. I knew of a family that built a log home with longleaf pine back in the latter 70's. They treated the logs before they put them up I don't know what the logs were treated with. I'm sure that they treated the out side of logs every few years. They built the log home with logs that they harvested from their land in North East Texas. ( Hallsville, Texas) I am also planning to build a log home in North East Texas also using pine harvested off the land. The question that I have is drying the logs. I am concerned about the Pine smell on the in side after it is dried in. I am considering sealing the inside with a epoxy sealant or wrapping the inside with house wrap where I plan on using drywall. My experience with yellow pine (long leaf pine) is that it bleads pine sap for quite a long time. I would like to talk to you some more so that we can pick each others brain. Good luck. stay safe.

  9. #9
    LHBA Member loghousenut's Avatar
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    Wayne, you have poured life into a 10 year old thread! Most 10 year olds are hard to shut up once they are wide awake. This should be fun.

    Personally, I'd get the biggest, Yellowest, cheap pine logs I could find and build a house with them. I'm sure I would love the smell when all was said and done.

    As for the sap dripping, it may be a nuisance for awhile, but by the time your Grandkids inherit the place it will have tapered off some.

    Sent from my Pixel 3a XL using Tapatalk
    Every time I have strayed from the teachings of Skip Ellsworth it has cost me money.

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  10. #10
    LHBA Member loghousenut's Avatar
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    Really, some trees weep more than others. It goes with the territory and I would put up with it and thank my blessings. We had one sap drip in a building I did 35 years ago that was irritating enough that I hung a yard sale coffee cup under it. Mostly stopped at about 1/4 cup or so. The cup is still there.

    Sent from my Pixel 3a XL using Tapatalk
    Every time I have strayed from the teachings of Skip Ellsworth it has cost me money.

    I love the mask mandate. I hardly ever have to bruh my teeth anymore.

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