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Thread: A better way to PEEL and DEBARK?

  1. #1

    A better way to PEEL and DEBARK?

    Does anyone know an easier way to peel the logs?
    How long does it take to peel a log that was cut in November if started to peel in April?
    Let's say the log is 40' long and 20" in diameter?

    I have seen some chainsaw adapters that really take it off fast!

    Just wondering what your take is on the subject. Looking forward to your replies.

  2. #2
    LHBA Member Scoutman's Avatar
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    Do a search on here for "spud".

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by 2012 Hopeful View Post
    Does anyone know an easier way to peel the logs?
    .
    again, it depends. depends on what method you use to peal, the size, species of your logs, what time of year they've been harvested.

    you have a lot of good questions. all will be answered in class, so that is my formal recommendation: take the class

  4. #4
    LHBA Member StressMan79's Avatar
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    probably the biggest factor is how long they sit... the sap will become epoxy, and getting the bark off becomes MUCH harder. line up your logs, get your foundation ready, then have them cut and delivered. peel immediately. Winter cut is best, but not that big of a deal for evergreens (the sap never "goes down" all the way anyway). FWIW. The member's side will explain it best... Oh, and DON'T USE A CHAINSAW ATTACHMENT FOR DEBARKING. you'll regret it.

  5. #5
    LHBA Member rocklock's Avatar
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    To answer your question...

    My son and I peeled (with some others help) 71 logs. Most were 40 foot long. Most tops were wither 10 or 11. The bottoms were up to 21 inches - most about 17. My son and I peeled about 4 hours a day. Our goal was to peel 4 logs per day each. Some days it took me 6 hours to peel my four - some days I just quit. These were Douglas Fir winter cut logs. I took us about 3 weeks. We ended in the first week of May, if I remember correctly.

    I would estimate that a 30 year old that weights 220 lbs can peel one log an hour... I took some what longer. We had one log that really dried out. Its number is #69. It took about 4 or 5 people and about 5 or 6 hours to finish the log with a demo hammer and chisel. I would have cut the damn thing up for fire wood but we needed it. It is in my wall and I know where it is... with all kinds of gouges...

    I would and have suggested that you power wash your logs before you stack them. You should work the logs as much as you can on the ground so you can rotate the log and get the best side facing in when you stack them... or you have some really ugly spots...

    On the members side there are really helpful hints that will make the jobs some what more manageable. But you should know, peeling logs sucks! Its just hard brutal work. I have pictures...
    Last edited by rocklock; 01-31-2011 at 03:57 PM.
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  6. #6
    LHBA Member Scoutman's Avatar
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    I peeled about 200 8' pine logs for fence posts in a barn one summer a few years back. I really enjoyed it. It got me time away from who is now the ex-wife.

  7. #7
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    I could peel about 2 poplar logs an hour if they were really dried, if they were still wet the bark would almost fall off on its own. I've seen summer cut poplar that by the time it got to the sawmill, it had no bark left, just moving the thing completely debarked it. Maybe a change of species would brighten your day...

  8. #8
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    Here's what I did, but just know, there may be some who would disagree with my method. It worked for me and it's been great. My logs (Doug Fir and Cedar) were harvested in the mid fall of 2009. It wasn't the best time, but we had a logging operation going on our ranch, so all the equipment was already moved in and logs were being shipped to the mill. I picked out the trees and logs, and my logger made it happen. Anyway, I was scheduled for the next class which wasn't until December. So, I put the logs up off the ground (240+) and hoped the bugs would leave them alone until I took the class and learned what I needed to. By the way, I think the days went to 36 hours long during that waiting time! I started peeling logs by Feb. 1 last year. I have about 40 left to go. OK, so here's what I did. Peeling with a spud was extremely tough because of the bark and I have a bad back, so I had to figure plan "B". One of the old threads mentioned a member who tried a demolition hammer and chisel with some success. So, I did some research and found Bosch just came out with a new, 7 lb., easy to use, chisel hammer. It's model #11320VS (I've attached a picture of it. That's what it looks like after peeling 200 logs!) It's light weight, comfortable to use with a variable speed trigger. I bought it for $289 (included shipping) from I think the Too Barn. It takes a little getting used to and you'll put a nick in the log here and there, but once you get the hang of it, away you go. So, I put a log up off the ground at shoulder height on top of two stacks of pallets (see attached photo), peeled down both sides, then used a pivey to turn it, and peeled the rest of it. Average time was 45 min to 1 hour per log ("12-15" at base) You still get a work out, especially as you work towards the base of the log, but easier I think than using a spud. Especially since I can't be bent over all day peeling logs with my back. Now granted, I have a tractor with a grapple to lift and move my logs around, so you'll need something like that or design a system to move them. The little nicks and cuts you might occasionally make will disappear in the walls when you put your logs together. Anyway, that's what I've had to do and it works great for me. About the bugs....they turned out to be a friend instead of a foe. Loghousenut posted awhile back that the bugs will eat at the bottom side of the bark and over time the bark will fall off the logs. SO TRUE! I'm a year into peeling my logs and the bark is coming off real easy! Very seldom do I find any burrowing trails or holes in my logs. They're mainly in the bark. Besides, I like the look of one of those trails on the surface of the log every now and then. I know a year is pushing it, but I'm almost done and its working out for me. Sorry for the long post, but wanted to share with you an alternative. Good Luck! (I TRIED TO ATTACH PHOTOS AND COULDN'T. I DON'T KNOW WHAT I'M DOING WRONG, SORRY)

  9. #9
    RPM
    Thanks for the info. I appreciate the time you took to tell me your story. I know what the majority of people will say about peeling the logs, (use the spud) but I want to hear it from all sides. Sure, I'll probably use the spud for a while. I, to, have a nagging back issue that I must be careful of. I also have time on my side right now. I can cut the trees this winter and wait. Perhaps after a year the peeling will be much easier, even with a spud. Either way, I just want to make sure that using a "power tool" was possible. Thanks again for your input.

  10. #10
    Forever. Or sometimes it feels that way. I agree with Rocklock. Takes me about an hour to two hours per log. Slow, mind-numbing work. Logs cut in winter are better wood (sap is down), but they are much harder to peel than summer cut wood.

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