Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Corner Post and Milled Log Construction

  1. #1

    Corner Post and Milled Log Construction

    Hello All,

    I tried searching the forum to find out more about corner post style home construction.

    This seems like a really simple way to build a home.

    Does anyone have any experiance with this method?

    http://www.loghomeslogcabins.com/LHL...log-corner.gif

  2. #2
    Sorry for posting 3 threads with the same topic. The picture in this one is what I wanted to show.

  3. #3
    LHBA Member Sasquatch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Jefferson State
    Posts
    81

    Do you mean piece-en-piece?

    Hey Joe,

    That looks very similar to piece-en-piece. Check out this member's home - they used this method:

    http://www.loghomebuilders.org/image...-lisa-sherrodd

    Cheers,
    Jason

    EDIT:

    The picture you referenced appears to use milled logs - something we tend to discourage here. But the concept can still be applied to unmilled logs.
    Last edited by Sasquatch; 01-11-2011 at 05:12 PM.

  4. #4
    Thanks Jason,

    I was considering using 6 X 6 corner posts with a grove slotted in from top to bottom. I would then cut a 2-3 inch tongue into each lot.

    The logs would then be stacked and the corner posts would receive the logs at the intersection.

    If its not considered sac-religious I would then lag the logs into the corner post with a blind lag screw?

  5. #5
    LHBA Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Dartmouth, Ma
    Posts
    63
    Quote Originally Posted by JOE View Post
    Thanks Jason,


    If its not considered sac-religious I would then lag the logs into the corner post with a blind lag screw?
    Actually, that's pretty close to sacriledge.

    Hiya Joe, The log homes here are all Butt and Pass, all other building methods are considered inferior. The diagram you posted looks like something a kit home manufacturer would come up with. Take a look around the site and check out some of the student BNP homes. The results speak for themselves. Good luck with your endeavor!

  6. #6
    LHBA Member loghousenut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Grants Pass, Oregon.
    Posts
    5,120
    Blog Entries
    1
    Corner Post and Milled...

    Joe, What they are trying to say is that there are a ton of reasons not to build in the style you showed in the photo. This site is all about a style of building (and living) that eliminates problems and allows a normal (present company excepted) man or woman to build a beautiful, bulletproof, log home for his/her family without a 30 year mortgage. Take the class and you'll see and agree with us.

  7. #7
    LHBA Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Dartmouth, Ma
    Posts
    63
    Quote Originally Posted by loghousenut View Post
    Corner Post and Milled...

    Joe, What they are trying to say is that there are a ton of reasons not to build in the style you showed in the photo. This site is all about a style of building (and living) that eliminates problems and allows a normal (present company excepted) man or woman to build a beautiful, bulletproof, log home for his/her family without a 30 year mortgage. Take the class and you'll see and agree with us.
    That is exactly what I was trying to say!

  8. #8
    LHBA Member PeeCee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Mie Prefecture, Japan
    Posts
    758
    (thought bubble starts here) "...If that is the kind of home you are hoping to build save your class dollars, buy a kit and sign up for the class in a few years when your logs have rotted out and your windows and doors won't open...oh wait, you won't be able to afford the class, a place to build, or logs because you'll still be paying off your kit home..." (end thought bubble)

    (begin friendly member comment)...is what most of us are thinking, but we're too nice to actually come out and say it

  9. #9
    Banned
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    On the top of a mountain
    Posts
    23
    Joe
    If your still hanging around after the warm welcome you have recieved. May I comment on the topic you have brought up. Picture your showing is of course a machine cut kit log home companys offerings (which have many issues I will not get into here). You sound like you want to do this style by handcrafting it. I have seen this in use and there are worse ways you could build a log house but it is not the easiest and has drawbacks that if aren't addressed will be a problem at some point in time. For example a stack of logs pinned, scribed, bolted etc. without a corner notch is not that stable. Like a panel wall between two doors or window is really easy to push over with the header to hold and stabilized it. And that would be what you would essentially have here is 4 panels walls with 4 corner posts.

    So your idea of a tongue and groove between the wall logs and post and a lag for good measure would work altho I would use a dovetail on the end of the logs at the wall/corner connection points this would allow a positive connection to the two perpendicular walls. But a dovetail is a lot of layout and chainsaw work. Even the groove you mention in the post if cut with a chainsaw is not for the inexperience or faint of heart. The "tongue" would require a lot of layout and chainsaw skills. If you feel confident in doing this you have a descent chance of pulling it off. I have seen people cut a groove or slot in the log AND post and use a drop in tenon like a piece of 2x lumber or even a narrow slot with a long piece of metal plate.

    But the next consideration would be that depending on the layout of the second floor/roof system and how the load is distributed to the corner post and walls you could easily run into the dreaded settling problems because the post won't settle but the walls will a fair amount!!! So to solve that you would need to build the house post and beam style. With the main floor and roof system all tied in together self supporting, with timber frame type connections everywhere with the piece on piece logs just filling in the holes between the posts. Here we go upping the layout and chainsaw work, engineering involed. If your confident still your either a talented builder or in for a rude awakening.

    If you pulled it off you would have solid, neat looking house. If this doesn't sounds like something you are capable of, or want to do the lhba method MAY be a better way to go, as it requires almost no death defying chainsaw work, little layout and has few engineering issues.

  10. #10
    LHBA Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Southern Kentucky
    Posts
    991
    MOST members here subscribe to the butt-and-pass method of construction. A few have built with what's called Piece-en-piece construction. Still a few others have built with notches, scribed logs, etc. At Skip's house, there were examples of several of these types of construction, and Skip had built log homes his whole life. It was his opinion based on that experience that for an inexperienced builder the butt and pass style was the easiest, cheapest, and least problematic.

    There are always reasons to build other ways; aesthetics, lack of materials, and lack of long logs can cause members to use other styles. Butt and pass requires logs that are longer than the walls themselves and these are not always available. So peice-en-piece may be used.

    From the picture you posted, it looks to me like you are trying to make this too complicated. If somebody else is milling your logs for you, you are probably looking at a kit home. If you are doing the shaping work on those logs yourself, well...that's just too much time, energy, and expense for most of us. And for any first-time builder, in my opinion. But hey, it that's the look you really really want, and you are willing to pay the price, I think everyone should build their own way, so long as it's safe. You'll just find a lot of detractors here, because many of us have built our own home in the butt and pass style and can tell you first-hand that it works.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •