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Thread: Butt and Pass load stacking question

  1. #1

    Butt and Pass load stacking question

    I'm giving serious thought to building a modest log cabin using the butt and pass method. In my review of videos of others building in this method, I noticed there is very limited load stacking with long gaps between the logs. I'm going to require an engineers stamp for the plans and I'm quite certain they'll question the load stacking as I plan to draw details of the butt and pass which will show gaps between the logs. How do you prevent the sagging of logs with roof loads coming down?

  2. #2
    LHBA Member loghousenut's Avatar
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    Take the class.

    Seriously this method eliminates your concerns about gaps and roof weight.

    Gaps! If you could see Mudflaps place you'd realize that gaps must not be an issue. His gaps are so big that they could play volleyball using his walls as a net. Not only did it pass inspection, but once it was chinked, it became the coolest looking house in northern Alabama.

    It's a system that works and your LHBA house will be legal, strong, beautiful, energy efficient, and you can do it with your own hands. Use the biggest, ugliest logs you can find and it will come out fine. Logs with a lot of taper (that are super tough to use in a notched house) are a cinch the way we do it.

    As for the roof, much of it is not supported by the walls and that gives you something to brag about (we'll tell you about big ridgepoles later).

    Anyway, take the class and you'll gain access to the private side of the forum. We'll hold your hand through the process and become friends as you build the coolest house in the neighborhood.

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    Every time I have strayed from the teachings of Skip Ellsworth it has cost me money.

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    Butt and Pass load stacking question

    LHN forgot to mention that when you become a member and take the class there are times that a “Bundle Plans” that goes up for sale on the website. There a few decent sizes to chose from, a shed and a garage. You pick your plan and take it to your draftsman to make your desired changes then get an engineer to approve and stamp.


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    Last edited by jgrajiola; 02-11-2022 at 02:54 PM.
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    LHBA Member mudflap's Avatar
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    we tried to avoid volleyball because it made the elephants nervous.

    but yeah, I built mine with logs that bent in 3 directions, full of knots, the worst taper you've seen, and I'm in love with it. I went from "should we even bother with these logs?" to a one of a kind home.


    christmas eve, 2021, installing my chimney pipe.
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    "cutting trees is more important than thinking about cutting trees or planning to cut trees." ~ F. David Stanley

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  5. #5
    LHBA Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgrajiola View Post
    LHN forgot to mention that when you become a member and take the class there are times that a “Bundle Plans” that goes up for sale on the website. There a few docent size to chose from, a shed and a garage. You pick your plan and take it to your draftsman to make your desired changes then get an engineer to approve and stamp.


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    That's only one benefit. The members side of the forum offers a wealth of information. My membership/trip to Vegas cost me $2-2.5K. It was worth every penny,
    Now it's all available online for about $500.

    Edit: I only took $40 cash for gambling and only slept 2 or 3 hours each night. HAHA!

    AND I didn't lose my $40 or $2500
    Last edited by allen84; 02-10-2022 at 07:02 PM.

  6. #6
    Thanks for the replies. Here's the thing. Years ago I started out as a residential designer/architectural draftsman, then I got sucked into the truss design business and have been doing that for 30+ years. So, I know about load stacking and I know that when you step out of the realm of stick framing, you need an engineer to approve your design to make sure it's structurally sound. I'm assured by the replies here that taking the class will explain the load stacking and gaps in logs. That's not good enough. The engineer I'm talking to has an arse for a front desk person and they won't answer a simple question "are you familiar with butt and pass log home building?". They want to see the plans first, but I can't draw the plans until I know how to draw the section and details for butt and pass. If I draw a typical cross section for butt and pass, it will show the cross section of logs quite literally floating one on top of the other with a gap, but with rebar pins and chinking. This would contrast drawing a scribed log home where the cross section would show each log supported by the log below. Do you see the dilemma? I'd like to draw the plans first before paying for the course and have the engineer tell me yes, they can work with me on butt and pass.

  7. #7
    LHBA Member Shark's Avatar
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    Sounds like you need a different engineer....

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  8. #8
    LHBA Member loghousenut's Avatar
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    I think you have the wrong engineer also. 99% of people who build this way use or slightly modify the LHBA plans. They work.

    Drawn by an archetect and engineered. Possibly this is the strongest type of log structure you can build. The plans will have to be stamped by an engineer in your State but that's never a problem. It is nice to deal with an engineer that knows this system and does not think that the Kit House manufacturers are doing it right.

    Serious. Take the class. If you aren't happy with it they'll give your money back. But you'll be happy.

    Sent from my Pixel 3a XL using Tapatalk
    Every time I have strayed from the teachings of Skip Ellsworth it has cost me money.

    I love the mask mandate. I hardly ever have to bruh my teeth anymore.

  9. #9
    LHBA Member loghousenut's Avatar
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    PS... Nothing wrong with drawing your own plans, but you'll draw them differently after you take the class. Everyone here has been through it all and I'm sure most of them would agree.

    Sent from my Pixel 3a XL using Tapatalk
    Every time I have strayed from the teachings of Skip Ellsworth it has cost me money.

    I love the mask mandate. I hardly ever have to bruh my teeth anymore.

  10. #10
    LHBA Member rckclmbr428's Avatar
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    I echo the above, you need to find a different engineer. Where will you be building? I know many engineers across the US that are familiar with the style of building
    www.WileyLogHomes.com
    "Hand Crafted Traditions"

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