Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19

Thread: Have questions on a log home purchase

  1. #1

    Have questions on a log home purchase

    There is a log home we have been in negotiations to purchase. But we ended in a stand still. Price was way over what that lake property would be. But we are back looking at it again but I have some questions my realtor can't answer. Its in Minnesota...how energy efficient is a log homes? Its 2400 sq feet with the walk out basement. Also there is one very main log in the center of the house with a deep crack running all the way down the side. Log is the beam running from one side of the house to the other side. Would that crack further? It was built by Pioneer log homes that does Timber Kings on HGTV. The logs are 24-36" around so huge...is that good or bad? What upkeep should I expect if we get this house? Thanks for any help. I want this one, my husband doesn't.

  2. #2
    LHBA Member loghousenut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Grants Pass, Oregon.
    Posts
    12,121
    Blog Entries
    1
    Please clarify. Are they 24"-36" around?, or diameter?

    Sent from my Pixel 3a XL using Tapatalk
    Every time I have strayed from the teachings of Skip Ellsworth it has cost me money.

  3. #3
    LHBA Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Poolesville, MD, building in WV
    Posts
    1,344
    Checks ("cracks" running with the grain) are generally not a problem, even long ones. A true crack going across the grain can be a structural failure waiting to happen. If you're seeing a check unusually long, it's probably good to have a pro look at it before committing to a purchase.

    Large logs are good. Instead of insulation, they provide thermal mass, and log homes can be surprisingly easy to heat. I'd recommend visiting one or two more during the hot summer, too.


    Peter

  4. #4
    LHBA Member rckclmbr428's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Roanoke, VA
    Posts
    3,636
    Energy efficiency and maintenance can vary widely based on design and construction. Each home is different. I'd suggest having a professional look at it and answer any questions you have before purchasing
    www.WileyLogHomes.com
    "Hand Crafted Traditions"

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by loghousenut View Post
    Please clarify. Are they 24"-36" around?, or diameter?

    Sent from my Pixel 3a XL using Tapatalk
    Isn't that the same thing? I guess diameter is the correct answer.

  6. #6
    It has central air too so won't be a issue in the summer. In our area I'm guessing a "pro" would be hard to find. When the realtor was doing the comparisons she found 4 log homes in the area. Thats why I'm trying to research this before we go down the log house path again. Might call the builder and see what they say about that one with the long crack.

  7. #7
    LHBA Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Poolesville, MD, building in WV
    Posts
    1,344
    Quote Originally Posted by yorkies307 View Post
    Isn't that the same thing? I guess diameter is the correct answer.
    "Around" could normally mean like a belt around my waist (circumference).
    A diameter would be measured at the end of the log, edge to edge, like a slash changing "O" to "CD". I hope my example makes sense.

  8. #8
    LHBA Member loghousenut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Grants Pass, Oregon.
    Posts
    12,121
    Blog Entries
    1
    The reason I asked if it was diameter or circumference was to get an idea how thick your walls are. Measuring 36" around the circumference of a log would mean that the diameter would be around 11".

    An 11" diameter log will behave differently in the heat and cold that a 36" diameter log. For example, my logs average 20" diameter. Yesterday, the temperature in sunny southern Oregon was over 110 degrees outside but only 78 degrees inside. No AC, no heat pump, no ice delivery to cook it down. Simply thermal mass that tries to keep a constant temperature.

    That's why we ask the size of your logs.



    Sent from my Pixel 3a XL using Tapatalk
    Every time I have strayed from the teachings of Skip Ellsworth it has cost me money.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by loghousenut View Post
    The reason I asked if it was diameter or circumference was to get an idea how thick your walls are. Measuring 36" around the circumference of a log would mean that the diameter would be around 11".

    An 11" diameter log will behave differently in the heat and cold that a 36" diameter log. For example, my logs average 20" diameter. Yesterday, the temperature in sunny southern Oregon was over 110 degrees outside but only 78 degrees inside. No AC, no heat pump, no ice delivery to cook it down. Simply thermal mass that tries to keep a constant temperature.

    That's why we ask the size of your logs.

    Sent from my Pixel 3a XL using Tapatalk
    I get it now! I'm a seamstress so we go by length and width. Its all the way around the logs. They are massive. I couldn't put my arms around most of them. The house is in Minnesota so the furnace will be on for 6 months of the year for sure. The owner never lived in the house during the winter months so there is no track record of cost to heat it. Our current house which is 2600 sq ft traditional house cost $75 a month to heat in the winter. I'm expecting more but wouldn't want to it to go in the $500 a month range to heat the house.

  10. #10
    LHBA Member Shark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Hauser, ID
    Posts
    3,306
    Quote Originally Posted by yorkies307 View Post
    I want this one, my husband doesn't.
    Might want to ensure both of you are on the same page....

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
    Completed #1 - Sold #1.....#2 about to start
    http://jandjloghome.blogspot.com/

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •