Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 24

Thread: Chinking material in Australia

  1. #1

    Chinking material in Australia

    Hello All,

    So I am new to the forum, and new to log homes. I recently purchased a log home here in Australia (built about 15 years ago). Sadly the previous owner who build the house, didn't take good care of it. Well, maybe fortunate for me, as I got it very cheap. But now I have the task of maintenance, and doing all the things he didn't. First and foremost, chinking, both inside and out.

    So down here, we don't seem to have access to stuff like PermaChink or LogJam that I can find. So I am using another flexible caulking material available down here called Sellys No More Gaps. BUT... am looking for any advice that you can give me. Maybe a different product that I can get down here. The stuff I used seems hard to work with than what I see you guys using over there.

    I did a trial run in one of the spare rooms, and for my first go, I am OK with it, but not happy with how it turned out. Will probably need to go over it and smooth it out more.

    I used the cake knife method.

    Cant seem to insert pictures I would post one up

    Cheers
    John

  2. #2
    LHBA Member loghousenut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Grants Pass, Oregon.
    Posts
    11,470
    Blog Entries
    1
    Go to Imgur.com and use the BB code to insert photos. We want to see what you are up against.

    Sent from my LGL83BL using Tapatalk
    Every time I have strayed from the teachings of Skip Ellsworth it has cost me money.

  3. #3
    LHBA Member Shark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Hauser, ID
    Posts
    3,101
    What type of material is the current chinking?
    Completed #1 - Sold #1.....#2 about to start
    http://jandjloghome.blogspot.com/

  4. #4
    Hi Guys, There is NO chinking done at all. Most of the logs fit snug, but for some reason the top ones seem to be half logs, and not sure why. I will see if I can post some pics.

  5. #5
    Here are some pics of the place when I inspected it.


    You will see that most of the logs that are full round, fit nicely. But near the top, they don't, and he tried to use some expanding foam rubbish to fill the gaps. I will try to get some better pics for you today to show that some of the gaps are quite large.

    https://imgur.com/a/WaLMaNo

  6. #6

  7. #7
    LHBA Member loghousenut's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Grants Pass, Oregon.
    Posts
    11,470
    Blog Entries
    1
    John, that is a complete different animal from the way we build here. Your style of log building is called scribed and coped. The logs are carved so that gravity makes them fit tightly together, requiring no chinking. In fact it is called chinkless on purpose.

    As you have noticed, the wind still comes in and out wherever it wants to as the logs settle and twist. The common cure is to caulk the seams.

    Go to Permachink or Sashco and nose around looking for videos that show your problem and their cure. They both put out a top product at a top price but you can afford it.

    Tons of colors and they will send samples. Some folks like to match the log color and some folks like to contrast.

    One last thing. If it is time to restain, you should probably do that first.


    PS... Congratulations on your new place. If you outgrow it, consider building your own like we do it here. It is a blast!



    Sent from my LGL83BL using Tapatalk
    Every time I have strayed from the teachings of Skip Ellsworth it has cost me money.

  8. #8
    LHBA Member rreidnauer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Allegheny highlands
    Posts
    10,343
    Yep, definitely not meant to be chinked. But if its sealing off drafts that you're after, a very fine nozzle followed by some sort of stiff, rubber tool to pack in any gap and scrape off and excess from surfaces, with a paintable latex or paintable combination silicone/latex caulk. (easy water cleanup) would be the route that I would go. Also, I would probably limit myself from doing this to only one side, either the interior or exterior of the home, to always allow moisture an escape path.

    There's a good chance that a draft baffle was installed between the logs already, in the form of fiberglass batting, that you simply can't see. Is there draft issues, or is this an aesthetic concern of yours?

    Sent from my SM-G955U1 using Tapatalk
    All my bad forum habits I learned from LHN

    Rod Reidnauer
    Class of Apr. 9-10, 2005
    Thinking outside the vinyl sided box

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by rreidnauer View Post
    Yep, definitely not meant to be chinked. But if its sealing off drafts that you're after, a very fine nozzle followed by some sort of stiff, rubber tool to pack in any gap and scrape off and excess from surfaces, with a paintable latex or paintable combination silicone/latex caulk. (easy water cleanup) would be the route that I would go. Also, I would probably limit myself from doing this to only one side, either the interior or exterior of the home, to always allow moisture an escape path.

    There's a good chance that a draft baffle was installed between the logs already, in the form of fiberglass batting, that you simply can't see. Is there draft issues, or is this an aesthetic concern of yours?

    Sent from my SM-G955U1 using Tapatalk
    It's the aesthetics. I will get another picture and upload later. Some of the gaps are large, and you can see the batting inside.

    Cheers
    J

  10. #10
    So here is what I am dealing with! You can see the insulation he has stuffed in there, so I think chinking is the only way!

    https://imgur.com/a/kuczBQz

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •