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Thread: Name That Log Home

  1. #1

    Name That Log Home

    Hello,

    New to the forum and very glad to have found you. My wife and I are seriously looking at buying a property with a log home in New England. They are not common up here and while I am familiar with stick framing I'm a little lost with this and the more I read on the Internet the worse it gets. Here is what I do know:

    It's called a Georgia Log Home (is that a style or company?) and it was built in the mid 80s. It has been owned for many years by a carpenter and if general appearance means anything he has taken very good care of it. That's about all I know. Here is a link to an image of the house: https://ibb.co/iYmnnm Hopefully it shows enough detail so that someone can tell me about its construction: full log vs. half, Scandinavian chinkless” construction vs “Canadian chinkless” etc. In the meantime, I'm going to start going through old threads and learn as much as I can.

    Thank you in advance!

  2. #2
    LHBA Member rckclmbr428's Avatar
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    It's a milled "log" home. Aka a kit log home. Stay away from it
    www.WileyLogHomes.com
    "Hand Crafted Traditions"

  3. #3
    Thanks for the response. What is it about a milled log home that is not good?

  4. #4
    LHBA Member mudflap's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pinch View Post
    Thanks for the response. What is it about a milled log home that is not good?
    Well, Ronnie can definitely tell you more than probably anyone, but the short answer is the more you process your logs- "milled" - the more it will cost you. And there's no benefit- other than in the building process. that milled home will settle, while a lhba home won't. Not to mention energy efficiency, loss of log integrity.

    Lhba is what I settled on after researching all of it for literally years. My biggest project before this was a chicken coop- now I'm stacking logs for the second floor. Most folks on here are the same. Except rockclmbr- he stacks homes for a living.

    We even have a retired muffin man, don't we, loghousenut?

    You can definitely do this.

    blog: https://loghomejourney.wordpress.com/
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    "cutting trees is more important than thinking about cutting trees or planning to cut trees." ~ F. David Stanley

    Photos: https://www.flickr.com/groups/buttandpasscabin/ (tell me if it doesn't work)
    blog: https://loghomejourney.wordpress.com/

  5. #5
    LHBA Member loghousenut's Avatar
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    Pinch, this is kinda like asking which cut of beef is the best at the Vegan convention.

    This forum and the entire LHBA is about as anti-kit house as they come. Please go back to the main page https://www.buildloghomes.org/ and take a peek down toward the bottom of the page and read what our founder had to say about owning a kit "log" home. He said it better than most of the rest of us could and most of the rest of us agree 100 metric percent with him.
    And you thought he was unteachable!

    Every time I have strayed from the teachings of Skip Ellsworth it has cost me money.

  6. #6
    LHBA Member rckclmbr428's Avatar
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    Here is a picture of a kit home that I was recently called out to look at. It was built in the 80's. This is what happens when you build a kit and then don't strip, treat, and restain the home every 8 years. All of the corners are completely rotted out, and most of the walls are rotted as well. This home is going to be torn down. It will cost more to replace all the damaged logs then start over from scratch. Can a kit be kept up and in good shape after 30 years? Sure, of you don't mind spending a good chunk of change and time keeping them up. But most people don't like a home that is a guaranteed time and money suck.
    www.WileyLogHomes.com
    "Hand Crafted Traditions"

  7. #7
    LHBA Member mudflap's Avatar
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    "U-G-L-Y, you aint got no alibi!" man, what a sad photo.
    --
    "cutting trees is more important than thinking about cutting trees or planning to cut trees." ~ F. David Stanley

    Photos: https://www.flickr.com/groups/buttandpasscabin/ (tell me if it doesn't work)
    blog: https://loghomejourney.wordpress.com/

  8. #8
    This has been very educational. Thanks to all!

  9. #9
    Wait, one more question: with these milled homes what is behind the exterior milled logs? Like with the sad photo posted by rckclmbr48, what's on the other side of those logs? Are they attached to a frame or is the interior wall just the other side of these logs? Would seem kind of thin if it was.

  10. #10
    LHBA Member rckclmbr428's Avatar
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    The other side typically is just the other side of the small logs, with r value being 1.6 per inch, a lot of times the homes don't even meet code for wall insulation. Here is a video from Kuhns Brothers, a kit log home manufacturer in PA lamenting the fact that they are being held to conventional wall insulation codes and how they won't be able to do it, and admitting that they don't meet code. Kits are made for ease of construction and the efficiency of production. Never mind meeting codes or having a product that will last. https://youtu.be/sZPwfrXncNg
    www.WileyLogHomes.com
    "Hand Crafted Traditions"

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