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Thread: Name That Log Home

  1. #11
    LHBA Member rreidnauer's Avatar
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    My area (I'm in central Pennsylvania) won't allow kit homes any more, due to the inability to meet energy efficiency codes. But since that place is pre-existing, meeting code doesn't matter, except for what effect heating it will do to your finances. I'd ask to see their past winter energy bills, to get an idea what you are getting into.

    Have you seen it in person yet? If not, they might have framed, insulated, and drywalled the inside to boost insulating values. At least nobody painted the "logs." (an easy way to cover up problems) but I would take a good look at the corners and below windows, especially on the North side. Taking an awl with you to poke and see if you find any soft (rot) areas is always a good idea.

    As far as settling, I suspect that is pretty much done at this point, but check for issues with doors and windows sticking/jammed. Looking for gaps where roof meets the log walls (usually most prominent near the ridge on the gable ends) is a sign of mis-handled settling management. (you really need a ladder to see if gaps are present)

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    Last edited by rreidnauer; 11-29-2017 at 08:03 AM.
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  2. #12
    LHBA Member mudflap's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pinch View Post
    This has been very educational. Thanks to all!
    So.....when you gonna join us?

    I think of that decade I wasted- I could be living in mine right now! 'course....10 years ago, the logs I'm harvesting for my build right now were much, much smaller....
    --
    "cutting trees is more important than thinking about cutting trees or planning to cut trees." ~ F. David Stanley

    Photos: https://www.flickr.com/groups/buttandpasscabin/ (tell me if it doesn't work)
    blog: https://loghomejourney.wordpress.com/

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by mudflap View Post
    So.....when you gonna join us? I think of that decade I wasted- I could be living in mine right now! 'course....10 years ago, the logs I'm harvesting for my build right now were much, much smaller....
    I'm with you but I have a lot to learn! To start I'm trying to "see" what you guys see. Here is another log home in CT I found this morning.
    https://ibb.co/kzohpb
    https://ibb.co/f7Lnpb
    https://ibb.co/d1MP2w
    https://ibb.co/fZ842w
    https://ibb.co/b40j2w


    I've compared it to what I've found here and it has elements of both a milled log home and a custom hand built home. What do you think? My guess judging from the outer walls is that it is milled but was it a kit? Do some of you mill your logs to get a more precise fit?

  4. #14
    LHBA Member rckclmbr428's Avatar
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    Believe it or not, this style is even worse than a standard milled home, the logs have been sawn flat top and bottom for ease of stacking, but the sides are left natural which results in varying widths of logs. The flat, upward facing part of the log collects rain water and it is wicked back in between the logs. There was a company near me (Western Virginia) back in the 80-90s building this style called Shawnee log homes. I have replaced literally thousands of feet of wall logs on multiple homes around here built in the exact same style. The one you linked pictures to seems to have been kept up, or at least a recent coat of gloss stain has been applied. Run, don't walk from that one.
    www.WileyLogHomes.com
    "Hand Crafted Traditions"

  5. #15
    LHBA Member mudflap's Avatar
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    You're gonna find a lot of variations in our group, but the end result is the same: most of us are building our own, with little to no experience, from logs that we peeled ourselves, paying as we go, and we're ending up with some really beautiful homes.

    I chainsaw off some of the more ornery knots, but no, I don't 'mill' mine. Of course, I'm one of the few that harvests my own trees (I'm not bragging, I'm just poor), but don't do this- just buy them already on a logging truck. But yes, some folks on here buy logs from a mill- not that D-shaped or channel grooved nonsense, but not hand-peeled either. Obviously, I'm in the snobby hand-peeled camp.

    On that 4th photo- I don't like logs that are exposed to the outside elements penetrating my walls- they will suck moisture from the outside and deposit it into your wall logs.

    But what is your end goal? you sound like you just want to buy one. As LHN said, you're gonna find yourself asking about the best cuts of beef at a vegetarian convention. Most of us are not much for buying existing homes - we're more about building them from scratch. Buying an existing log home puts you on the wrong end of the economy. Build it for $60k, then sell it for $600k, not the other way around, see? It's more of a belief system than a building system- as in we believe you shouldn't spend 30 years paying for a home. This method (LHBA) will help you avoid doing that.

    Keep researching, you'll come around.
    --
    "cutting trees is more important than thinking about cutting trees or planning to cut trees." ~ F. David Stanley

    Photos: https://www.flickr.com/groups/buttandpasscabin/ (tell me if it doesn't work)
    blog: https://loghomejourney.wordpress.com/

  6. #16
    LHBA Member rocklock's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pinch View Post
    I've compared it to what I've found here and it has elements of both a milled log home and a custom hand built home. What do you think? My guess judging from the outer walls is that it is milled but was it a kit? Do some of you mill your logs to get a more precise fit?
    Our basic idea is to build it our self. There are a few variations but a Chain saw is a very important tool.

    Natural round logs, peeled by hand, not too long after they are felted is what we use.

    Look at the pictures. Look at my pictures.

    If you want to work hard, then this is the place to continue to learn...

    Don't buy a kit home...
    Dave
    --> The unaimed arrow never misses....
    --> If can, can. If no can, no can... Hawaiian Pidgin
    2011 video http://secure.smilebox.com/ecom/open...a413d0d0a&sb=1
    2006 to 2009 video http://s154.photobucket.com/albums/s274/flintlock1/
    If you are gonna be dumb, you better be TOUGH!

  7. #17
    Wow, this has been a real eye opener. I've had a love of log homes all my life and I'm at a point in life that I'm considering buying one. I never considered building it myself but you have me thinking - especially since many of the properties we are looking at here in New England are basically forests. That said, I'm not sure we have the best species for the job although pine, oak and maple are common. I want to retire and do a little farming so imagine if clearing a field could provide material for my log home? That's about as green and natural as you can get.

    I'm still in relatively good shape so maybe I can do this. I have a lot of research to do so here goes. Thanks to everyone who responded. I admire what you're doing.

  8. #18
    LHBA Member loghousenut's Avatar
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    Pinch, your hand built log home would put either of those kit places to shame. I know mine does, and it will be standing, solid as a rock, long after my Grandsons are dust.

    Sent from my LG-H631 using Tapatalk
    And you thought he was unteachable!

    Every time I have strayed from the teachings of Skip Ellsworth it has cost me money.

  9. #19
    LHBA Member rocklock's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pinch View Post
    , I'm not sure we have the best species for the job although pine, oak and maple are common. I want to retire and do a little farming so imagine if clearing a field could provide material for my log home? That's about as green and natural as you can get.I'm still in relatively good shape so maybe I can do this. I have a lot of research to do so here goes..
    I am 73 and I started at 62...I have been on this forum a long time...

    Look at more pictures... Being in good shape helps, but even LHN has been able to build. It helps to have a son to help... I have two...

    Welcome...

    About what species to build with... In class they go into various species but the general rule is you build with what you got... Almost any species will work if you have the right size, build correctly and keep them dry...
    Dave
    --> The unaimed arrow never misses....
    --> If can, can. If no can, no can... Hawaiian Pidgin
    2011 video http://secure.smilebox.com/ecom/open...a413d0d0a&sb=1
    2006 to 2009 video http://s154.photobucket.com/albums/s274/flintlock1/
    If you are gonna be dumb, you better be TOUGH!

  10. #20
    LHBA Member loghousenut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rocklock View Post
    I am 73 and I started at 62...I have been on this forum a long time...

    Look at more pictures... Being in good shape helps, but even LHN has been able to build. It helps to have a son to help... I have two...
    .

    A Son, a Wife, and time.

    And you thought he was unteachable!

    Every time I have strayed from the teachings of Skip Ellsworth it has cost me money.

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