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Thread: michigan plans

  1. #11
    I'm laughing at myself here. I have read through at least 100 threads so far with multiple offshoots based on members comments. I've got so many links saved, hydronics, rocket mass heaters, roofing options, foundation options, etc, etc, it's starting to get stupid.

    Somewhere around page 50 or so I found a comment by a particular member that had me digging on yet another tangent which brought up a question for those in Michigan. I'll keep digging around the DNR and USFS websites to see if I can find more info.

    Red, white and jack pine seem to be the dominant building tree for the state. Wooded land is running around $1,000/acre, with accompanying buildings at times as a free (sic) bonus. Has past logging killed options of harvesting mature logs or is it more of a cat and mouse game for where one buys land? It's been so long since I lived there (1989/90) that I just don't remember.

  2. #12
    LHBA Member ivanshayka's Avatar
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    When you are buying, try acquiring land with enough logs (around 100 standing pine trees, red or white) to build a home, regardless if the land been logged or not. When purchasing, walk the land, hug the trees, check out the neighborhood and type of people around, to see if it even close enough to what you are looking for. Taking a class is another option you should consider to do before or after the land purchase (note: it is recommended that you take the class before you purchase your land).

    I'm not sure if this answers your question.
    Last edited by ivanshayka; 08-27-2017 at 07:57 PM.
    Every time I stray from teachings and suggestions of LHN it has saved me time and money.

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  3. #13
    Ivans, I take whatever info I can get. Thank you for the response. Big trees take time to grow. I'm just curious if past logging throughout the state has reduced usable sized timber as a whole. How tall would a tree tend to be to allow a usable taper over a 30-40 feet span?

  4. #14
    LHBA Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lightfoot View Post
    Big trees take time to grow. I'm just curious if past logging throughout the state has reduced usable sized timber as a whole.

    I just had all the "marketable hardwood" logged from 20 acres of my land (Middle Tennessee, most was cut from probably +/-5 acres right in the middle) There is still a lot of hardwood trees that I could use to build and they didn't take any of the species I plan to use. I guess it really all depends on how picky you want to be about the logs you build with.

    And another way of looking at it... If you can find land you like at the right price without the trees, go find trees.
    Last edited by allen84; 08-27-2017 at 09:32 PM.

  5. #15
    LHBA Member ivanshayka's Avatar
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    The whole state was logged from 1880s to 1940s. In late 40s may be early 50s, Michigan governor flew over the state and was appalled at the deforestation. So, he initiated a program where you could get free red and white pine seedlings. The pine rows (plantations) you see in northern MI are from the 50s and 60s. They are good enough for me, 11" to 14". Tapper depends on the tree, usually 3" to 4" over 35'.

    So, the answer for your question if the logging reduced the usable logs in the state, answer is yes. But, it did not totally eliminated it. There are plenty of acreage with big (and sometimes huge) pines. But are you willing to move few miles from where you want to build it?
    Every time I stray from teachings and suggestions of LHN it has saved me time and money.

    Don't suck face with no Banker who drives a nicer car than you do... LHN 3:21.7

  6. #16
    LHBA Member
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    We are building in southern Michigan. Has been very easy to get permits and start working. All the zoning and building people are very nice (and curious to see the final product!) I don't think you should have any problems building here in Michigan :-)


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