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Thread: Experience with, and opinions of, outdoor wood boilers.

  1. #41
    LHBA Member eduncan911's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Little Eagle View Post
    Thanks you very much for in the insight duncan, i did find this post about the outside air idea tell me what you think.

    http://www.woodheat.org/the-outdoor-...h-exposed.html

    And this one made me think that maybe a fireplace would be worth having as a main source of heating in the winter . . . .just maybe?

    http://www.texasfireframe.com/
    I've read that page before. The "myths" they say don't hold up to scientific scrutiny are based on specific remote conditions. I've wondered what angle they are coming from with quotes like this in the header:

    "The nation needs to return to the colonial way of life, when a wife was judged by the amount of wood she could split. W.C.

    One example is an outlet pipe not property shielded from cross winds may create a positive pressure on the fireplace and blow air out the inet. Of course it would! That's why they make wind guards (and carefully planning your stove pipe would be ideal as well). You'd have the same problem with a wood stove or any other outside-air fed heating source.
    Eric Duncan - LHBA Class: May 2012 - http://eduncan911.com

    "A government is a body of people usually notably ungoverned." - Shepherd Book, Firefly

  2. #42
    LHBA Member eduncan911's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stamic55 View Post
    Duncan, I grew up with a circulating fireplace. I don't like it. If you lose power you lose you heat source. Leave the door open for heat and you have the inefficient fireplace. Ours had the chimney on an outside wall so we'd need to stick an electric heater in it before starting to counteract downdraft. A woodstove in a properly sealed house is the way for me.
    I did too and didn't really like it as the main source of heat for the house - especially for how large our log homes are (Ronnie's small cabin example is a perfect example of big fireplace in small home = great). We had central heat for that on a great power grid. There are electric versions, and also their are "feed from the bottom" air vents (which is important to size property and keep the pipe in house as mentioned above).

    How did you like it when you did have power?

    Most insurance companies won't insure you unless you have a primary heating source anyways (not a fireplace). I'll be installing radiant heat in basement and in bathrooms to get the OK for my area of build. A large fireplace is just a nice to have to seal the deal.

    Yes, ideally it is placed in the center of the home. I've been slowly planning a LHBA home with one in the middle, but it would require deviating from the blueprints I already have - which I'm not privy for at this time since I'll have radiant heat as the primary at this time. And to have a stove pipe all the way to the roof through 3.5 stories is HUGE (and might be cool)! I've seen one home that wrapped stairs around the center fireplace. That was a lot of $$$.

    It should be noted I plan on building a few of these homes... All opinions above are subject to change for my final and "will retire in" home.
    Last edited by eduncan911; 02-12-2015 at 12:14 PM.
    Eric Duncan - LHBA Class: May 2012 - http://eduncan911.com

    "A government is a body of people usually notably ungoverned." - Shepherd Book, Firefly

  3. #43
    LHBA Member Little Eagle's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eduncan911 View Post
    I've read that page before. The "myths" they say don't hold up to scientific scrutiny are based on specific remote conditions. I've wondered what angle they are coming from with quotes like this in the header:

    "The nation needs to return to the colonial way of life, when a wife was judged by the amount of wood she could split.” W.C.

    One example is an outlet pipe not property shielded from cross winds may create a positive pressure on the fireplace and blow air out the inet. Of course it would! That's why they make wind guards (and carefully planning your stove pipe would be ideal as well). You'd have the same problem with a wood stove or any other outside-air fed heating source.
    I actually didn't see the part about woman splinting wood.

  4. #44
    LHBA Member Little Eagle's Avatar
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    I am starting to think that i may go with a wood broiler and a wood heater (maybe a blaze king?) as a back up/pretty thing.

  5. #45
    LHBA Member loghousenut's Avatar
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    My Wife wouldn'ta been much in demand in Colonial times. She can't even get the splitter started half the time.


    She is a pretty good Boss though.
    Every time I have strayed from the teachings of Skip Ellsworth it has cost me money.

  6. #46
    LHBA Member Tom Featherstone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by loghousenut View Post
    My Wife wouldn'ta been much in demand in Colonial times. She can't even get the splitter started half the time.


    She is a pretty good Boss though.
    She can't get the "splitter'er" started most of the time......

  7. #47
    LHBA Member loghousenut's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Featherstone View Post
    She can't get the "splitter'er" started most of the time......
    Maybe I wouldn'ta been much in demand in Colonial times either.
    Every time I have strayed from the teachings of Skip Ellsworth it has cost me money.

  8. #48
    LHBA Member logguy's Avatar
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    Slightly off topic, in keeping with my passion for cheap azz tools because a. I'm a cheap skate, and b. Because I regularly lose tools before I ever get to use them, I purchased a "lil house" outdoor wood heater for my 2100 sq ft home. $1,600 bucks. This thing was easy to install and will easily heat a home this size. It sucks from wherever you run the 8" flex duct, as opposed to forcing/blowing heat into the house. The blower is a common item and costs about $100 if you ever have to replace it. You won't, but if you ever had a problem with a far room not sucking enough air to pull the heat to it, you can install a $25 inline duct blower/sucker fan. This baby paid for itself in. One winter. Went from $500 per month to $100 electricity bill. Holy crap! Only issue was that I burned about 3 times the wood I thought I'd need and was cutting wood all winter to stay warm.
    Every man dies. Not every man really lives.
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    Everything in life is luck.
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    If your goal is wealth, you will die a poor man.

  9. #49
    LHBA Member Axeman15's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rckclmbr428 View Post
    For me the efficiency isn't the big selling point, it's not having to carry all the wood into the house before burning it. I live in the middle of the largest deciduous forest on earth, if I have to burn an extra cord a year it'll cost me an extra mornings worth of work to cut and split it. My friend has one that heats his house, his pool, and his garage as well as his hot water tank. He has a deal with a local tree company that they can dump wood on his land for free. He just splits it and puts it in
    I am looking at the same type of system...several builders who all claim super efficiency and big burn barrels. Burns 99% efficient! or so the story goes. I have a friend who will deliver logs to my property. The barrel will hold over two foot logs and to stuff 3 or 4 in it should work well. I will heat my home, my shop and I have thought of running a station partially down my driveway, close to my garage entrance. I will weigh that line out. in the home, registers monitor the heat which I continually hear is different from convective heating systems. All this and I am still gathering as much info as I can to do the best job conceivable...one time.
    I will continue to monitor conversations, attend classes and attain as much information as possible.

  10. #50
    I have an out door wood furnace and there is some things that arnt that good , they burn more wood than an indoor one and and the size of the wood makes it not very good for woman the cheap ones do smoke more than is really necessary, but saying that I love mine, all the wood is outside (no mess) they are big pieces so just throw in a few pieces and good for the day the extra wood is a bit more but you don't have to split and pile it saving a lot of time I use it to heat my hot water tank and my hot tub and I put in about 4 pieces a day ( over 30 inches long) but that is alot of wood but I live in Canada trees all around and snow coming down

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