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Thread: A Lot of Trepidation

  1. #1
    LHBA Member
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    Great State of TX: Freedom
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    A Lot of Trepidation

    Well, it's JustMe. North Texas. Thinking about enrolling in the next class. I need reassurance. You have to understand, this is the first time I've considered a log home. Back 17 years ago in Dallas I bought a house that, as it turned out, was a Craftsman kit built back in 1917. Beautiful and well-constructed pier and beam home. So, I understand the concept of 'kits,' even though, here, we're not talking kits. We're talking the pioneer spirit, the do-it-yourself and live free spirit -- just like that kindred spirit who built the Craftsman.

    But, I'm still anxious about making the next step. I fully realize, from the public website of LHBA, that this concept is without fault. But can I do it? You probably know more about what I'm asking in that question than I do. I am in my late 50s with (having married late and divorced even sooner) a 9-year-old daughter. I'm cerebrally negotiating the dynamics of purchasing a sufficient property and building a LHBA home while providing my daughter the best schooling she can get. (I did an online assessment of a 'stick-built' home of the proportions I wanted and it came out to be $272K - 'material' and 'labor' included. NO CAN DO. Enough of that. (We're talking Sherman, TX-area for those of you in TX, Oklahoma). I have to be honestly realistic here about my decisions. I'll be working a 'job' for as long as she is in school.

    So, I'm guessing I'm asking people to help be my conscience. My gut says 'go for it.'

  2. #2
    LHBA Member BoFuller's Avatar
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    May 2011
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    Seligman, Arizona
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    I'm 64 and I just finished putting my walls up. I have a 9 yr old granddaughter.
    If the gumption is in you to do it, then go for it.
    If you're just looking for inexpensive housing, I'd recommend a nice fixer upper stick built.


    My 2 cents

    Bo (AZ Ranch)

  3. #3
    LHBA Member edkemper's Avatar
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    So Central Oregon
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    JustMe,

    To start with, the cost of the class is a start in the right direction. We can't share here all you'll learn in the class. But if you read the posts of those that took the class who then the go back home and before they get on the member's side, you'll get an idea of the life changing info you receive. On the other hand, the cost of the class is just the key to the door. On the other side of that door are a huge number of people just like you. Some single, some with partners and most with children. But all seem to be of the same mindset, unhappy with the current state of affairs and looking for a better alternative. We members make nothing off the cost of the class or off you personally after you get on the other side. What we do gain is another member of the family. A family full of people with the expertise of just about anything you need or want to talk about.

    Can you do it? Yes. I'm a gimpy old man of 63 with an "almost" 5ft, 100# wife and autistic son and we are going to be building our home. I'm not now and never been a contractor. But we plan on doing everything ourselves. Others choose to hire out some or most of their build. But mostly, we do most of the work with the help of old and new friends.

    You're a spring chicken and will have a wonderful laborer to help with your build and in the process, become a much stronger and closer family.

    Before you make the commitment, read everything on the public side. There is a lot of friendly advice by members on the public side. You'll get a feel for what we are and what we offer. You'll never again be alone.

    PS: You'll also find we are a pretty insane group that love to have fun. But we all seem to share a common goal. Not everyone that takes the class builds a log home. But everyone that takes the class is changed in a profound way. Don't rush into anything. take your time and get a feeling of who we are. Either way, welcome to our site.
    edkemper

    Class: Valentine's Day weekend 2009

    Feel the Bern!

  4. #4
    LHBA Member loghousenut's Avatar
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    Oct 2005
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    Grants Pass, Oregon.
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    I wish I was still in my late 50's.




    Follow your heart.
    Every time I have strayed from the teachings of Skip Ellsworth it has cost me money.

  5. #5
    LHBA Member rocklock's Avatar
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    Aiea, Hi or when it's warm Camano Island, Washington
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    Age is not a factor. Desire and stick to it are much more important. If you like to make stuff this is the ultimate project. Obtw I turned 70 this year and I'm not the oldest.
    Dave
    --> The unaimed arrow never misses....
    --> If can, can. If no can, no can... Hawaiian Pidgin
    2011 video http://secure.smilebox.com/ecom/open...a413d0d0a&sb=1
    2006 to 2009 video http://s154.photobucket.com/albums/s274/flintlock1/
    If you are gonna be dumb, you better be TOUGH!

  6. #6
    LHBA Member loghousenut's Avatar
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    Mr. Me,

    For the record, there are plenty of non-geriatrics building LHBA homes too. We old frats have to blow the trumpet every once in awhile to tell everyone we are still on the right side of the turf. You are not to old chronologically.
    Every time I have strayed from the teachings of Skip Ellsworth it has cost me money.

  7. #7
    LHBA Member blane's Avatar
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    Go for it! It want be easy and there may be moments you will say what have I gotten myself into. But in the end you will be glad you did it.

  8. #8
    LHBA Member Shark's Avatar
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    Feb 2006
    Location
    Hauser, ID
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    3,033
    I had my 30th birthday in our first log home we built... Hoping I'll have my 40th in our second
    Completed #1 - Sold #1.....#2 about to start
    http://jandjloghome.blogspot.com/

  9. #9
    LHBA Member Brook's Avatar
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    May 2012
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    West Virginia
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    Can I be the voice of caution?

    First of all, you will not learn everything you need to know in class. It's only two days and it is not hands on. There are some big mistakes you can make with this method and there is not enough info in class given to help someone who is not a builder avoid those mistakes. I know because I took the class, I have no background in construction, am building, and am making those mistakes. I can not turn back now, but I would if I could. I would build a stick house if I had it to do over. It would be faster, easier and cheaper. I would be done by now.

    I will love looking at my logs when it is done, but they are making life and house building so much harder than it has to be. Nothing in a house of this type will be straight, square or level ever. Think about that. It means the time and effort to do even simple things will be amplified exponentially. People take years and years to build these houses. House building does not have to be that hard. If you pay someone to help you build and you pay by the hour, you will be paying for that complexity. The time and money involved is more than you are led to expect in class.

    I'm not even entirely convinced that the concept is "without fault". I doubt it can ever be satisfactorily sealed and I suspect that energy efficiency and weather tightness could be lacking. Yes, a log is great insulation, across it widest girth, but what about the chinking? What about the chinking gaps? I have yet to live in my house but I can imagine many potential problems and I hear about them from others.

    I am sorry to sound so negative but this is actually a difficult technique. Yes, you CAN do it. But, you can also possibly get in over your head, be unable to reverse course, and be sorry. I wish you luck with whatever you choose.

  10. #10
    I have a lot of building experience and could build myself a stick frame house if I wanted, but I never will. Both before and after class I have considered doing an ICF house, but my better half and I decided that we don’t care about any of the draw backs to a log home, we just want to log home.

    However I still think an ICF home with live-edge Adirondack siding and some log accents would look beautiful, be easy and fast to build, and be very energy efficient. If I ever do build a home like that, I would use the roof and exposed beam 2nd story style taught in the class.

    This gives you an idea of how it could look when finished.

    http://www.specialtywoodproductsadk....nstorm/two.png

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