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Thread: Another thought abut the class

  1. #1

    Another thought abut the class

    So we were talking with our adult son last night about us taking the class and he had a good question. Even though we love log houses he prefers a different look. He too is hoping to build his own house in 3 years since he has quite a bit of time off in between his shifts (he's a firefighter). With the information we will learn in the class will we be able to transfer it to building a P&B craftsman for him? Since we will be learning about milling the logs can that same principle not be used to harvest his 2x4s, headers etc? Being that it will be a pier and beam even the plumbing and floor set to a degree would be the same right? None of us have any real building experience, wait, does a shed count?
    Thanks
    Gina

  2. #2
    the main intent of the class is how to build tightly pinned butt and pass homes.

    having said that, what we learned in class has helped us save a bunch of money in other aspects of our lives as well.

    I don't think your son will learn how to build a P&B Craftsman by attending class

  3. #3
    LHBA Member loghousenut's Avatar
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    My Wife didn't like the look either... til after class. She and her ex had built a really nice kit home and that was her idea of what a log home oughta look like... til after class. We drove 10 hours to get to Skip's place she had a skeptics argument every time she saw a log structure... til after class.

    A year and a half later I got a chance to build a notched and chinked, semi authentic looking, old log house for a movie. Patty wanted me to turn the job down because it wasn't a LHBA style house.

    I say talk the kid into taking the class with you. He's not to old to learn is he?
    Every time I have strayed from the teachings of Skip Ellsworth it has cost me money.

  4. #4
    LHBA Member eagle's Avatar
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    I guess I will give my opinion for what it is worth: I don't think the class will help much for a P&B home. However, if you have any interest in log homes in general it would be beneficial to gain a good understanding on what is good and what isn't in that type of construction. You'll never look at another one without "judging" the build. The other advantage is being a member of the forum where you get more info on many more things, which can be adapted to other builds. The members side is priceless for all the knowledge and experience of others.
    Ken and Audra Dinino
    "Determined to build my log home before I leave this world"
    "living in Texas but building in NY. Dragging my logs one trip at a time..."

  5. #5
    LHBA Member rocklock's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jkgge View Post
    So we were talking with our adult son last night about us taking the class and he had a good question. Even though we love log houses he prefers a different look. He too is hoping to build his own house in 3 years since he has quite a bit of time off in between his shifts (he's a firefighter)
    A few facts. I am 70. My son went to class and both sons have helped. This is an educational site and no one gets anything except the satisfaction on helping others. You can look at my photobucket site for videos and about 400 photos that I have used as a reference to help others.

    If your son really wants to build anything, IMHO, he will benefit from the class, especially if he helps you build the interior. A tightly pinned log home is four walls and a roof. A bathroom is a bathroom no matter where it is built. Granted it is more challenging when you need to plumb next to 14 inch logs but its doable. Same thing with the electrical system.

    Working with my sons, family and friends is a very interesting and revealing. It seems that everyone is now amazed at the progress now the we are close to being done. I am thinking about building another... wait a minute, let me lay down until it passes... Anyway, talk to fireman9. I think he can help...
    Dave
    --> The unaimed arrow never misses....
    --> If can, can. If no can, no can... Hawaiian Pidgin
    2011 video http://secure.smilebox.com/ecom/open...a413d0d0a&sb=1
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    If you are gonna be dumb, you better be TOUGH!

  6. #6
    LHBA Member blane's Avatar
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    I have a couple of friends that have log homes that are of various building methods and one friend that built a post and beam. I would never point out many of the problems that are apparent to me because they love their homes and are as proud of them as I am mine. And even though theirs are a little more "polished" than mine and have that store bought look where mine has a roughness to it ( which I preference) unless you take the class you would never know the difference between the rough looking Skip style that will last longer than your great grandchildren and the one that may last as long as your mortgage.

  7. #7
    LHBA Member
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    It not "rough look" it's "rustic" there is always somebody that tries to point out flaws every time I tell them "it's rustic" that's how it's suppose to be

  8. #8
    LHBA Member loghousenut's Avatar
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    Yours may be "rustic" but mine will be ROUGH. Rough as the woman I love.
    Every time I have strayed from the teachings of Skip Ellsworth it has cost me money.

  9. #9
    LHBA Member rreidnauer's Avatar
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    I kinda like the idea of LHBA butt & pass walls, with timber-framed post & beam interior structure for girders, support columns, and such.
    All my bad forum habits I learned from LHN

    Rod Reidnauer
    Class of Apr. 9-10, 2005
    Thinking outside the vinyl sided box

  10. #10
    LHBA Member Tom Featherstone's Avatar
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    Gina, You won't learn about milling logs in class. We don't mill our house logs, that would be lumber. You may decide to mill rafters & beams or 2x material if you wish. The focus is in building with whole logs. If your son doesn't want a log home, have him look into a ICF construction, he can finish it anyway he wants.

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